Keep  Delaware County EMS on the streets of Muncie.

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The people have been up and down, over and under by Muncie Mayor Dennis Tyler and his City Council.  It’s called “his” City Council because the majority of the members will do as the party dictates.  We don’t want another bloated and costly department.  We want to keep the service which has done an excellent job for 40 years.  We don’t trust this administration to work for the best interest of the people.   We want to know that DCEMS will come when we call.  Listen up, we DON’T want Tyler’s ambulance service.

Keep  Delaware County EMS on the streets of Muncie.

 

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Quiet in the Village – Truth? What is truth? Updated. Updated again.

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Update:  Ball State will be purchasing Mitchell and Sutton properties according to the Muncie Star Press (3-1-18)

“Mayor Dennis Tyler, through a representative, was favorable of the outcome. “I think it’s great. The city appreciates their partnership with MCS,” he said.”

Ball States wants two elementary schools

Looks like the battle is over for Halteman Village.

_________________________

Muncie Redevelopment Commission director, Todd Donati, posted on his Facebook page, he is ready to clear up misinformation.  So here we go, folks.

Todd Donati
15 hrs ·
All, please share this article with everyone. People need to know the truth about our housing crisis. There are those out there that think this is a fabrication. It’s for real.

Hundreds of employees from BSU and IU BMH that transition each year in these institutions, and many others, cannot find the housing to live in Muncie/Delaware County, so they locate elsewhere and commute, or they don’t come at all.

The study has been completed and the facts are in.

Our community CAN grow and meet the needs of the hundreds that cannot be a part of our community because we are NOT building new homes.

We need people that work hear to also live and invest in our community, if they can. We are losing $12,825,000.00 annually in projected new household income. That could relate to nearly $20 million in economic impact…each year.

In five years, that could relate to nearly $100 million in economic impact within our community. All of this is leaving our community because we choose to not build new. This is going to another county to fix their roads, supports their local businesses and lowers their taxes. 2-14-18

The study Todd Donati cited was commissioned by the City of Muncie.  Unable to locate the document on the City of Muncie’s website.  The company Zanola Company and MarketGraphics Research conducted the study.  However, as of this post, the complete document is not available in the City of Muncie’s website.

To divert this upcoming crisis we will need to build 405 new homes over a five year period, or 81 a year.   We don’t have 81 homes on the market today?  Well, let’s see.

Using Realtor.com ran a report on properties in Delaware County with the price range of $100,000 to $250,000.  The search returned 115 properties from condos to new builds.  Two new builds in Pine View subdivision (Muncie city) have been on the market for 100+ days.  The subdivision has a minimum of 16 lots available which haven’t been developed and on the market a maximum of 660 days.

If you are looking for a less expensive home $50,000 to $99,000 Realtor.com returns 131 properties, condos, single family, pending sales, land and lots in the Saddle Brook subdivision.  Of course, Saddle Brook would be out of the price range for most IU Health and BSU employees.  The lots range from $36,000 to $72,000.

This brings us to a total of 246 available properties.

Currently, Todd Donati and Mayor Tyler are working to build condominiums in Halteman Village.  The housing is needed, they say, based on the study paid for by the city.    The tried and true theory of Supply and Demand comes into play.  If the supply is so low and demands so high why aren’t we seeing a noticeable increase in private developers building homes?   If there is such a demand, why is the city providing financing thru the Muncie Industrial Revolving Loan Fund (RIFL) to the developer of Halteman Village condos?  How many interested buyers do we have for these condos?

During the emergency meeting on February 9th, two community members spoke.  When comments about the project became a little intense, Mayor Tyler called for a vote to rescind the bid offers.    It was out of the blue.  The only property in question was Mitchell Elementary School, but he pulled all of the bids.  Why?

The vote seemed to be choreographed, as if was all for show.

I predict it will come back up for a vote again.  Mayor Tyler will argue against, but it will pass and Dennis Tyler will come out looking like he did something.   That’s not an unusual occurrence with this administration.

Mr. Donati claims people need to know the truth.  Who’s truth?  What is the truth?  Mr. Donati always claims the citizens are incorrect or misinformed and he alone knows the truth.  He received a poor score on his management of Muncie Redevelopment Commission for 2014 & 2015.  He claimed he was only doing what the previous director had done for 20 years.  He said he didn’t know.  All finance were to be handled by the city controller beginning in 2017.

If there is any misinformation floating around it stems from lack of transparency on the part of the City of Muncie and Muncie Redevelopment Commission.  If you visited the city’s web page on MRC you would have found the last year for the minutes of MRC meetings was in 2010.  Now, even the 2010 minutes are no longer available.

MRC Page not found 2-17-18

We checked out the controller’s website to see if we could find information on MRC since they handle all of Muncie Redevelopment finances as of January 2017.

Nothing.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

MRC = Muncie Realestate Commission

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todd donatiDirector of the Muncie Redevelopment Commission speaks to the issue of Mitchell School.

Todd Donati shared his first post.

There is a lot of misinformation and confusion going around that needs to be addressed. We are going to invite all the entities involved with the misinformation and either clear this all up and determine if the MRC will continue with the projects in play. The MRC had always shown interest in some of the properties that the MCS had to offer, including Mitchell, Storer, Sutton and land on Cornbread Rd.

The MRC had been contacted by a demolition company out of Richmond, IN that wanted to demo the schools for salvage. The MRC could not really do anything with the properties with buildings in place. The demolition company said they really did not want the land. So the demolition company offered the land to the MRC, for free, once they removed the buildings. The MRC board agreed to this only after we contacted BSU and asked them if they were interested in any of the properties. They had the right to buy them all.

The MRC was told that they did not have any interest in any of the properties but Northside MS. You have seen the recorded document waiving their right to buy. So the MRC board agreed to donate $658,600 to the MCS if they were to accept the $125,000 offer from the demo company. This would garner the MCS much needed revenue, this would allow the MCS to achieve their objective, illuminate the liability of taking care of these abandoned buildings and help generate at least $20- $50 million in taxable revenue on these combined properties.

The MRC board did not close these schools. The MRC board, nor the City of Muncie administration did not create the financial crisis within the MCS. The MRC board was only trying to create opportunities for the community we support. It seems that there are comments out there that we, the MRC and the City of Muncie asked BSU to give these schools up when in fact, BSU really wanted them. We have no interest in doing that. The MRC board would like to ask BSU if in fact they do want these schools.

The MRC board does not want to get involved with any form of miscommunication, especially with our community partners. And, we feel that BSU is a very valuable and important community partner. If BSU wants these schools, our board is prepared to take action. However, it needs to be BSU that openly states that this is what they want…not hearsay comments from unauthorized citizens. 


There were no lies made or personal gains made from anyone in this group. I appreciate the hard work and dedicated members of the Muncie Redevelopment Commission. They volunteer their time to make our community better.

Disclaimer: The only changes made to this public post is breaking the comment into paragraphs for easier reading.  Nothing else has been altered.

A word from Larry Riley

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Larry Riley
Yesterday at 5:26pm ·
I still meet regularly with “the informants,” the people who touched off the federal investigation of the Muncie city administration, those persistent folks who doggedly kept pestering the FBI until agents concluded they were, indeed, onto something.
Since November of 2015, FBI agents talked to them dozens of times and until perhaps summer of last year continued to solicit information from at least one of them. As recently as six weeks ago, the FBI still was interviewing other people.
Provided that one day the investigation ends – hopefully with more indictments – I will ask permission to name the informants. They are heroes in my book and deserve the gratification of an entire community. Their relentless tenacity, perhaps obstinacy is a better word, won out.
I just found out about another development that I have to suspect is connected to the FBI’s investigation: as of two months ago, Arron Kidder is no longer part of the Dennis Tyler city administration.
Arron Mathew Kidder went to Elkhart Memorial High School and came to BSU, where he majored in political science and graduated December of 2012. While still in school, he interned for Brad Bookout’s consulting company and got involved in the Delaware County Redevelopment Commission. When Tyler took over the mayor’s office in 2012, Bookout did some consulting for the new administration and hired Kidder, who eventually handled most of the city’s grant-writing work. A year later, Kidder spun off his own consulting firm, Hawkins Consulting Inc., and contracted with the city to write grants.
In 2014, he earned $35,000 from the city, his only consulting client, who gave him an office next to the mayor’s. Kidder began assuming more and more duties that typically would have gone to a deputy mayor, a position Tyler has not filled. The next year, 2015, with a whopping contractual increase, Kidder earned more than $60,000, and in 2016, he got $55,000, an amount in excess of the salaries of all but a couple city department heads.
Kidder sat in for the mayor on a handful of boards. He regularly attended Muncie Board of Public Works meetings as the mayor’s emissary, bringing contracts Tyler wanted approved and other matters before the three-member panel, who exist to do the mayor’s bidding. Several times I recall Kidder telling the board that the city needed to tear down condemned houses under emergency conditions and that the administration had obtained quotes from two companies to do the work. The lower quote would invariably be from the private firm owned by the city’s Building Commissioner, Craig Nichols, who would have condemned the houses in the first place and declared the emergency.
I first wrote in February of 2016 that some of those houses Nichols’ firm was paid to demolish hadn’t existed: they were phantom demolitions. The administration quickly created a cover story claiming that all the addresses were mere clerical mistakes, but by then, the FBI, already probing into Muncie Sanitary District, had added Nichols’ billings to their investigation.
Six months later, The Star Press pulled the plug on my column-writing. Four months after that, the FBI raided the city building commissioner’s office and seized records. A month later, February of 2017, Nichols was indicted on 33 felony counts, almost all related to work he did for the city, including the phantom demolitions and the attempted cover-up I wrote about.
Kidder certainly was a rising star in the Tyler administration. Tyler put him on several local boards, including the Aviation Authority. Kidder lived in a house he rented from the vice-chair of the Delaware County Democratic Party and he involved himself in party activities. Last September, The Star Press wrote a glowing profile of Kidder in a section on up-and-coming Muncie leaders.
Then, two months later, Kidder was suddenly gone. No announcement.
Through November when he got his last check, Kidder had received $66,000 from the city in 2017.
Not many Ball State graduates in their first position out of college knock down $60,000-plus annual salaries, and I can’t imagine many young people in their mid-20s simply walking away from that kind of money. Not without a whole lotta motivation, that is.
Please share this with any Muncie people still hoping justice prevails.

Muncie Tax & Finance Dashboard

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Have you ever wondered about Muncie’s finances or how the people on the city’s finance committee figure how to spend it?   I know, it’s a mystery, right?   Well, not any longer.  Now you too can be a pseudo city controller.  It’s easy.  We’ll show how simple it can be.  And it’s free.

The new report format is not as fancy as the older reports.  Not as detailed, either.  Nevertheless, it tells a story of Muncie from 2011-2017 in a clean, easy to read and understandable format.  Muncie Politics has prepared two reports for you to review.

The first is the Muncie Tax Finance dashboard 2011-17.   It’s Muncie at-a-glance report.

Muncie Tax Finance dashboard 2011-17

The next report Muncie Tax and Finance Time Comparison 2012-17 displays the tax rates and basic information in a clear timeline.  Yep, the tax levy has increased every year.  As well as the city payroll.  2015 wasn’t a good year for Muncie or Delaware County residents.

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September 2015 the city raised a 43% income tax.  From start to finish it took 14 days to pass that tax.  Amazing, huh?   The sad part is, no one even noticed prior to the tax increase the city finances were shaky.  That’s o.k. because the city building commissioner received a nice raise and his company demolished buildings paid from the increased EDIT in 2016.

See, folks, it’s all good.

Muncie Tax and Finance Time Comparison 2012-17

Now, if you want to explore the city’s taxes and finances all one has to do is click on the image below.   Enter your favorite government agency and then choose the type of report.  Bam! You are good to go!

Indiana Gateway Interactive Tool

You will be armed with enough information to make a wise decision at the polls come election time.   When an elected official, an appointed “public” employee, or a candidate tell you something you’ll be able to discern if it is true or if they are just blowing smoke.   A wonderful position to be: an informed citizen.   A scary thing to those who lust after monetary gain for their benefit.

Source: in.gov/itp

Poll: BSU – MCS Partnership

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Muncie Community Schools – Why MCS needs to change

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ABC 123 Apple copy copy

Why does MCS need to change?  Why is it imperative Muncie Community Schools must look outside the box?   It seems obvious, the old standard way of running the district is broken, it is ineffective, outdated and MCS is labeled as a “distressed district”.

Enter into House Bill 1315 and the latest amendment current as of 1-19-18  Here you can read the bill and read the amendments.

Here’s what we can glean so far.  Ball State University would like to manage the school district.  An appointed board of seven members, two which will be appointed by the Mayor of Muncie and Muncie City Council.    The board will hire a superintendent.  MCS may receive additional funds from the State of Indiana, but no funds from Ball State University will be used.   MCS employees will still be MCS employees.  Of course, this is only a short summary and more will be available.

Listen to the interview with President Mearns on Indiana Public Radio.

We don’t want to spend much time on how Muncie Community Schools became Distressed School District with a state take-over, but we do need to have a look at the history.

The chatter on social media sites is awash with opinions and comments.

One of the issues seems to be the loss of voting for school board members. However, we had five elected board members prior to the state take-over.  Today the board has absolutely no power.  At the most, they’re consulted by the emergency managers, they can’t vote on anything.  The superintendent is powerless, too.  He’s a lame duck.  State votes to take over Muncie Community Schools 

Less than two months past  Muncie Teachers Association and others supported relinquishing that right.  Knowing the State would make elected officials ineffective and all power removed and handed over to a hired company – the goal was achieved.  What’s the difference?

Muncie Community Schools has never had a solid long-term plan.

Circa 2005 the district embarked upon an aggressive improvement plan.  Bonding out approximately $50 million in debt.  Despite all the economic factors, such as the loss of jobs, decrease in enrollment and population, businesses shutting down the board decided to move ahead with the bond.

In 2010 the Blue Ribbon Task Force presented the administrators for consideration a plan for the district.    It collected dust until 2013 when the school board voted to consolidate the two high schools.  This after the referendum was defeated.

Prior to the referendum, MCS held four Town Hall meetings presenting several proposals for the district, yet at the State hearing for busing, we found the district had no plan.   No one from the City of Muncie, not the mayor, not the chief of police presented a safety plan although we were told there was one.  NO PLAN – let this sink in.

Doing the same thing and expecting results.

The administrators and boards have used the same plans for decades.  It consisted of shutting down schools or borrowing.  That’s it.   They ignored State Board of Accounts audits.  Ignored repeated deficit line items.  The newest school sold for pennies while keeping open deteriorating elementary schools. A short-term fix was all we were offered.  The $10 million bond for school repairs dumped into the general fund and used for administrative purposes.  No one can say for certain how that money was spent.

Debt reports:

Original bond information:  MCS 2014 Debt bond 1-27-18

Debt summary 2013 to 2017 MCS Debt Reports 2013-16 1-28-18

Having no plans, or limited plans have proven to not do a darn thing for moving Muncie Community Schools forward.  If the label “distressed” isn’t a wake-up call for change, nothing will open your eyes.

A fresh new plan:

Partnering with Ball State University, community organizations, and individuals, the school board, the elected officials in a collaborative and healthy environment will do more for our children and school district.  We must set aside our political ideologies, desire for control and stop thinking about our own wants over the needs of the most important people…the students of Muncie Community Schools.  A good school district will do more for Muncie then all the economic development we spend millions to produce with very little return on our investment.   Larry Riley penned a column several years ago similar BSU’s proposal. Incremental steps won’t help Muncie Community Schools

Accomplishing a working environment conducive to education and economic development may be the hardest thing the area has ever had to do.   Simply because it’s not in our nature to put aside our turf wars and think outside the box.

Nothing else has worked.